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Book Marketing on a Shoestring

Valuable Tips for Authors – Don’t Miss This

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How Authors Can Promote their Books Without Spending a Lot of Money 
Book Marketing on a Shoestring is  available: 
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00UAVL3LE
on Amazon Kindle for only $3.99.

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OVERVIEW OF THE CHAPTERS:
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PART ONE
Why Book Marketing is Important – and Rewarding.
How Readers Will Find Your Book.
Author/Entrepreneur – Do You Have What it Takes?
Marketing Possibilities Seem to Be Overwhelming!
The Internet is Full of Bogus Stories.
What’s the Difference Between Marketing and Selling?
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PART TWO
Evaluate Your Current Publishing Situation.
Let’s Start With the Basic Tasks.
Get a Professional Author Portrait.
Create Your Avatar.
Use Your E-mail Signature.
Join the Most Effective Social Media Sites.
Join Reader/Writer Communities — Online and in Person.
Start a Website and/or Blog.
Sell Your Books from Your Website/Blog.
Create a Business Card, or Bookmarks.
Outline an “Elevator” Pitch.
Start a Newsletter E-mail List.
Write Blog Articles as a “Guest Blogger”.
Write Prequels for Your Future Novel.
Contribute Content to Article Directories.
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PART THREE
You Never Get a Second Chance …
Write a Compelling Blurb.
Edit, Edit, and Edit Even More!
Increase Readership: Create an Audio Book.
Will Print Copies Sell More Books?
Get an ISBN Number.
Why do you Need a Copyright Registration?
List Your Book Worldwide.
Create Excitement with a Book Cover Poll.
Gather as Many Early Reviews as Possible.
Get Advance Book Reviews from Magazines and Newspapers.
Get Pre-Orders for Your New Book.
How to Deal With the Media and Book Bloggers.
Submit Photos of Your Book Cover.
Sign up on HelpaReporter.com. 
Create a Media Kit.
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PART FOUR
Marketing Steps Within Your Book’s Content. 
Choose the Correct Category/Genre.
Let Your Readers Pay With a Tweet.
Press Releases for a Review—are They Worth the Effort?
Create a Separate BOOK PAGE or AUTHOR PAGE.
Organize Your Book Launch Party.
There are at least 17 Online Book Retailers.
With a Little Help from Your Friends…
Get More Book Reviews.
Cross Promotions and Blog Tours.
Create a Slideshow for Your Book.
The Power of Book Trailers.
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PART FIVE
Book Marketing Strategies
Selling Books and e-Books to Libraries
Offer Your Book to Book Discussion Clubs.
How to Profit from an Award
Get Interviews on Radio and TV Shows.
Improve Visibility for Your Books.
Connect All Your Social Networking Sites.
Read from Your Books at Libraries.
Book Signings at Local Bookstores
Get Your Book Translated Into World Languages.
Sell Your Foreign Rights.
How About a Movie Deal for Your Book?
How Else Can You Leverage Your Manuscript?
Bestseller Tips from Trade Publishers.
Checklist for Your Book Marketing (Timeline)
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Book Marketing on a Shoestring  contains 103 pages, chock full of valuable tips for authors, and will be very affordable priced at US$3.99.  If you are a frequent reader of our blogs, you can already imagine how useful this new ebook will be for your own book marketing!
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Thanks for writing a review after reading it  : )
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Posted by on March 13, 2015 in Book Deals

 

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It’s this Time of the Year

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Income-Tax

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Benjamin Franklin said that “nothing is certain but death and taxes.”  It’s that time of the year again when we all must sit down and face the reality of just how much we did or did not earn during the last twelve months. Many writers are not aware of how they should be reporting certain income to get the greatest benefit.  Writers can get away with business tax deductions that ordinary people can’t get away with. Michael N. Marcus wrote a great article and showed samples of “tax avoidance”:
“If you are an author or a journalist, the key to creative tax avoidance is to write about things you like.”

 

  • If you like to travel, write about travel, and then deduct the cost of traveling.
  • If you like cars, rent some really cool cars, and write about them.
  • If you like to eat—and who doesn’t?—go to lots of restaurants, attend cooking schools, stock your pantry, and write about food.

Read his whole blog article here:  It’s Time to Think About Taxes

 

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Writers are presumed to be a professional if their writing made a profit in at least three out of the last five tax years, including the current year. Which means:  Not more than two years of expenses that are higher than the author income. Profits from your writing cannot be used to offset other income for tax purposes, such as a day job or other means of income, if you have more than two years of losses.

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Considerations of Profitability
There are a couple of other considerations that revenue agencies, such as the IRS, are listing, for example:

  • Have you made a profit in similar activities in the past? If you have a successful book under your belt — or even a series of articles in paid publications, such as newspapers, magazines or online publications, which can be a predictor that you are a professional writer.
  • Do you have the knowledge needed to carry on the activity as a successful business? How much do you know about running that business? Are you running it like a business, keeping records, keeping an eye to profitability? Did you take classes/seminars about the publishing business (e.g. marketing or tax etc.) no matter if online or offline?
  • Have you created a professional book marketing and publicity plan? This might even be shown by including affiliate programs on your website/blog. If there are losses, are they due to circumstances beyond your control or did they occur in the start-up phase of the business?

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Expenses You Can Deduct
Always try to pay from a separate account, set up for your writing business, to make book keeping easier. Keep receipts or / make copies of payments to contractors, freelancers and agency fees for book production, such as:

  • Proofreading
  • Editing
  • Illustrations
  • Photos
  • Graphic Design
  • Book Layout
  • Printing costs
  • eBook Formatting
  • Advanced Copy reviews
  • Book Trailer Design
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Book Promotion Costs, e.g.:

  • Advertisements, online and offline
  • Giveaways (free books, review copies, pens etc.)
  • Flyers, brochures, business cards, book marks
  • Book Fair expenses
  • Costs for newsletters (AWeber, MailChimp etc.)
  • Entry fee for writing contests
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Other costs, such as:

  • Transportation costs (note the dates, distance, reason)
  • Rental for book readings
  • Office rental or mortgage, heating, electricity for your home office by square feet
  • Phone / Internet / e-Reader costs
  • Website / blog costs, such as hosting or development
  • Office Supplies
  • Meal expenses: in the USA full for public events you might host, and 50% if it is for a business purpose (interview, writers conference, meeting with book professionals, publishers, agents etc.)
  • Transportation to meetings, events
  • Research costs
  • Copyright registration and ISBN fees
  • Your tax preparer or tax lawyer.
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Keep all your expense slips sorted by date and neatly filed to make it easier to find them
If you pay anyone of the above listed more than a couple of hundred dollars, you would need to include the contract and a form (in the United States it is IRS Form 1099-MISC). Note for each meal/entertainment expense the names, number of people participating and reason for meeting).

Further Reading:
http://www.freelancetaxation.com/deductions-writers
http://www.bus.lsu.edu/accounting/faculty/lcrumbley/tax_aspects.html

Disclaimer: These tips are meant to give general insight into tax information to writers, especially in the USA, and to give you an entry point so you can research further. While every effort was made to ensure the information in this article is accurate at the time it was written, we are not tax experts. Anyone filing taxes should consult a qualified tax prepare r for updated tax laws and further specifics on how these rules might apply to your individual tax situation.

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If you would like to get help in all things publishing, have your book intensively promoted and learn how to navigate social media sites: We offer all this and more for only $159 for 3 months! Learn more about this individual book marketing help: http://www.111Publishing.com/Seminars
Or visit http://www.e-book-pr.com/book-promo/ to advertise your new book, specials or your KDP Select Free Days.

Please check out all previous posts of this blog (there are more than 1.070 of them : ) if you haven’t already. Why not sign up to receive them regularly by email? Just click on “Follow” in the upper line on each page – and then on “LIKE” next to it. There is also the “SHARE” button underneath each article where you can submit the article to Pinterest, Google+, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr and StumpleUpon.

Thanks a lot for following:

@111publishing

http://www.111publishing.com

http://www.e-Book-PR.com/

http://www.international-ebooks.com/

http://bit.ly/VmtVAS 111Publishing @ Google+

 

 

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Authors: Which of Your Expenses are Tax-Deductible?

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Tax-Deductions

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Income tax preparation might be months away, but it is never too early to start collecting expense receipts. Many self-published book authors want to make a profit and become a professional author, having writing as their vocation.  Writers are presumed to be a professional if their writing made a profit in at least three out of the last five tax years, including the current year. Which means:  Not more than two years of expenses that are higher than the author income. Profits from your writing cannot be used to offset other income for tax purposes, such as a day job or other means of income, if you have more than two years of losses.

.
Considerations of Profitability
There are a couple of other considerations that revenue agencies, such as the IRS, are listing, for example:

  • Have you made a profit in similar activities in the past? If you have a successful book under your belt — or even a series of articles in paid publications, such as newspapers, magazines or online publications, which can be a predictor that you are a professional writer.
  • Do you have the knowledge needed to carry on the activity as a successful business? How much do you know about running that business? Are you running it like a business, keeping records, keeping an eye to profitability? Did you take classes/seminars about the publishing business (e.g. marketing or tax etc.) no matter if online or offline?
  • Have you created a professional book marketing and publicity plan? This might even be shown by including affiliate programs on your website/blog. If there are losses, are they due to circumstances beyond your control or did they occur in the start-up phase of the business?

.
Expenses You Can Deduct
Always try to pay from a separate account, set up for your writing business, to make book keeping easier. Keep receipts or / make copies of payments to contractors, freelancers and agency fees for book production, such as:

  • Proofreading
  • Editing
  • Illustrations
  • Photos
  • Graphic Design
  • Book Layout
  • Printing costs
  • eBook Formatting
  • Advanced Copy reviews
  • Book Trailer Design
    .

Book Promotion Costs, e.g.:

  • Advertisements, online and offline
  • Giveaways (free book review copies, pens etc.)
  • Flyers, brochures, business cards, book marks
  • Book Fair expenses
  • Costs for newsletters (AWeber, MailChimp etc.)
  • Entry fee for writing contests
    .

Other costs, such as:

  • Transportation costs (note the dates, distance, reason)
  • Rental for book readings
  • Office rental or mortgage, heating, electricity for your home office by square feet
  • Phone / Internet / e-Reader costs
  • Website / blog costs, such as hosting or development
  • Office Supplies
  • Meal expenses: in the USA full for public events you might host, and 50% if it is for a business purpose (interview, writers conference, meeting with book professionals, publishers, agents etc.)
  • Transportation to meetings, events
  • Research costs
  • Copyright registration and ISBN fees
  • your tax preparer or tax lawyer.
    .

Keep all your expense slips sorted by date and neatly filed to make it easier to find them
If you pay anyone of the above listed more than a couple of hundred dollars, you would need to include the contract and a form (in the United States it is IRS Form 1099-MISC). Note for each meal/entertainment expense the names, number of people participating and reason for meeting)

Further Reading:
http://www.freelancetaxation.com/deductions-writers
http://www.bus.lsu.edu/accounting/faculty/lcrumbley/tax_aspects.html

Disclaimer: These tips are meant to give general insight into tax information to writers, especially in the USA, and to give you an entry point so you can research further. While every effort was made to ensure the information in this article is accurate at the time it was written, we are not tax experts. Anyone filing taxes should consult a qualified tax prepare r for updated tax laws and further specifics on how these rules might apply to your individual tax situation.

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If you would like to get help in all things publishing, have your book intensively promoted and learn how to navigate social media sites: We offer all this and more for only $159 for 3 months! Learn more about this individual book marketing help: http://www.111Publishing.com/Seminars
Or visit http://www.e-book-pr.com/book-promo/ to advertise your new book, specials or your KDP Select Free Days.

Please check out all previous posts of this blog (there are more than 940 of them : ) if you haven’t already. Why not sign up to receive them regularly by email? Just click on “Follow” in the upper line on each page – and then on “LIKE” next to it. There is also the “SHARE” button underneath each article where you can submit the article to Pinterest, Google+, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr and StumpleUpon.

Thanks a lot for following:

@111publishing
http://www.111publishing.com
http://www.e-Book-PR.com/
http://www.international-ebooks.com/
http://bit.ly/VmtVAS 111Publishing @ Google+

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Hyper Smash

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Benefits of Becoming a Publisher

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Success-with-Publishing

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Did you write three or more books already?
Congratulations to every author who accomplishes this with lots of perseverance. You really have earned your royalties. For sure, the “Taxman” is as happy as you are. But you also had expenses and should be able to deduct them from taxes that you pay for royalties. For sure you will write more books, so it is almost natural to register as publisher and deduct even more expenses:

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• Computer, printer, fax, scanner, copier and other office equipment
• Furniture, carpet, blinds, cleaning material, cost for a maid etc.
• Telephone, cell, wireless, cable
• Insurances, banking fees
• Software and computer training
• Travel cost such as hotel, car, taxi, plane
• Car payments, car insurance, gas, repairs
• Webhosting, Domain name, web designer
• Writers and publisher conferences
• e-Book conversions, cover design, editing, copy editing, layout and desktop publishing
• Rent / Mortgage and Heating / Electricity etc. for the space you work in – and storage for your books if you go the “paper route”.
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You can find lots of practical tips how to set up your own publishing company and how to distribute your book worldwide in a series of articles here at this blog.  Self-publishing “Guru” Dan Poynter’s book “Self-publishing Manual” describes in detail all the tax breaks.
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Another professional adviser in all things print, publishing and book distribution is Aaron Shepard, who wrote: “Aiming at Amazon” and “POD for Profit“. His great knowledge of book distribution is extremely helpful for newcomers to publishing. A good idea is to sign up for Aaron Shepard’s blog.  Learn more about the process to become a small publisher from these blogs & web sites:

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https://savvybookwriters.wordpress.com/2013/04/09/how-to-plan-your-publishing-business/

https://savvybookwriters.wordpress.com/2013/04/10/how-to-start-your-own-book-publishing-business/

https://savvybookwriters.wordpress.com/2013/04/11/becoming-your-own-publisher-book-production/

https://savvybookwriters.wordpress.com/2013/04/12/how-to-organize-printing-or-print-on-demand/

https://savvybookwriters.wordpress.com/2013/04/13/distribution-of-your-print-book/

http://www.aliciadunams.com/starting-your-own-publishing-company/

http://parapub.com/sites/para/information/produce.cfm

http://www.wellfedwriter.com/blog/

http://booknotselling.blogspot.com/

http://www.bookmarket.com/
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The advantage of business ownership for independent authors far outweights the work involved.  And deciding to write a book means, that you already have decided to be in business. Go for it! What holds you back?

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If you would like to get help in all things publishing, have your book intensively promoted and learn how to navigate social media sites: We offer all this and more for only $ 159 for 3 months. Learn more about this individual book marketing help: http://www.111Publishing.com/     Once you are on this website, click on Seminar to register.

Please feel free to check out all previous posts of this blog (there are 815 of them : ) if you haven’t already. Why not sign up to receive them regularly by email? Just click on “Follow” in the upper line on each page – and then on “LIKE” next to it. There is also the “SHARE” button underneath each article where you can submit the article to Pinterest, Google+, Twitter, Chime.in, Facebook, Tumblr and to StumpleUpon.

Thanks a lot for following:

@111publishing

http://on.fb.me/TvqDaK
http://bit.ly/VmtVAS 111Publishing @ Google+

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Did You Make These Book Marketing Mistakes?

books
Kickstarter.com “A new way to Fund & Follow Creativity” was the last resort for an emerging author to fund her POD book project which was previously sold in e-book version.

She wrote in an article: “At the time of writing this, I am franticly trying to raise another $1,658 to meet my Kickstarter goal. $4,400 didn’t seem like so much when I launched the campaign for my novel a few weeks ago.

I am quietly panicking, but I trudge on. I gave myself 30 days, which meant I needed to raise an average of $142/day. So far, I have exactly $2,742 with 46 backers. I continually work to keep visitors excited and donating for the duration of the campaign.

To cut down on costs, I started with an e-book on Amazon, and was able to get a bit of press here and there. However, I was missing a significant portion of my potential market only going the Kindle route, and I wanted, for example, my grandparents to be able to read my novel. So, I put $250 into a book cover, and pre-ordered copies from Createspace.com.

After all of my closest friends and family members bought their copies, I realized I needed marketing. Sales were declining…

Finally, I admit that working in social media, I tut-tutted email marketing as if it were so archaic. I was wrong. Most people are on Facebook, but pretty much EVERYONE has email.  Start building your list now!!! The day I emailed my contacts on my email list, I raised $350.”

My comment:  Have a marketing plan ready, BEFORE you publish your book. Shop around for cover design, layout, printing etc. early on, look at elance.com and Fiverr.com, start your authors platform and contacts even BEFORE you are writing your book. Every business has to have a business plan, even the book publishing business – in which you are after all as a self-publisher.

 

 

 
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Posted by on December 27, 2011 in Marketing, Self-Publishing

 

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