RSS

Monthly Archives: April 2013

Author Interview: Lawrence Winkler

.
In 1980, a maverick young doctor gave it all up, to hitchhike around the world. He wrote four books about his experience, which I personally find some of the best travel literature, even topping my former favorite, Bill Bryson.

.

Lawrence Winkler

Lawrence Winkler

His name is Dr. Lawrence Winkler, now a medical professor on Vancouver Island, Canada, from whom you would not expect sentences like these:
.
“Tip the world on one side & everything loose will land in Los Angeles”,
.
“We honed the fine art of stuffing a Falafel, so a dollar could last all day” or
.
“If you want to sell your whisky to buy hashish, I may be of service, he said…”
.
I really love to read his books and have the honor today to interview him.

 .

Lawrence, what inspired you to start writing?
I had promised my father that I would someday write a book about my hitchhiking trip around the world. He was a pillar, a good man, and not quite convinced that my wanderlust was anything other than a selfish indulgence.  Unfortunately, he died before I finally began typing the story. My writing was initially an exercise in legitimization. But then I discovered that I had entered a new universe, which was not only wonderfully fulfilling, it was fun.
.
How would you describe your books to someone who has not yet read them?
The most fascinating books I’ve read have always been narratives that were alive on many different levels. So far I have written two kinds of books. The first, ‘Westwood Lake Chronicles’ is a dreamscape diary of our deliberate attempt to live with nature, under the inexorable development pressures of the exploding population around us. The second set of books, a quadrilogy of a five year hitchhiking trip around the world in the 1980’s, is an attempt to present the world, as close to the ground as I found it, as an odyssey that defined my identity and destiny. I believe I have written the consummate epic travelogue, like no other you will ever read.
.

Westwood Lake

.
Is there a message in your books that you want your readers to grasp?
I would like my readers to see the fine interconnection of many aspects of life that they may not have previously understood to have any connection at all. I want them to see how complex, sophisticated and intricate, and yet how simple, the richness of this experience is. I hope to inspire them to see the little details as the great whole, and how the quantum is related to the cosmic, how the tragic and comic duality of our short existence is the source of how deep and wide we can live.
.
Are your characters based on real people?
Oh, yeah. But I hope they don’t notice, and I will deny it, if anyone else does.
.
Who is your favorite character and why?
Tough one. Steve of the Jacuzzi is an archetype, and still a best friend. Gold Tooth was comical, Hair Trigger Ray dangerous and tragic, Mike and Mike were Doonesburyesque, and I never saw them again. Wayne the Rock was personified evil, Harold Broomberg and Mr. Godfrey saints, Mama Szlapak  an oracle, and they were just in Orion’s Cartwheel, the first book of the quadrilogy. But I loved Hungry Butterfly, the Japanese guy who escaped his father’s factory to travel in Eastern Europe, and found his own liberation. Hahahaha.
.
Between the Cartwheels

.
Are your plots based on your real-life experiences?
Absolutely.
.
Give us an excerpted quote from your favorite review of a book:
“Not a gulp-able book – it should be savored in sips.”
.
Thinking way back to the beginning, what’s the most important thing you have learned as a writer from then to now?
That it is always possible to do better, if you care enough to slow down, and take the time.
.
Considering a book from the first word you write to the moment you see it on a bookstore shelf, what’s your favorite part of the process? What’s your least favorite?
I actually have yet to see my words on a bookstore shelf, as I have yet to produce a physical print copy. My most favorite part of the creative process is seeing a large number of ideas separated by what I had thought were insurmountable barriers avalanche into a brilliant epiphany. My least favorite part of the creative process is, having to exclude the many other people and things I love about life, to concentrate my efforts on creating the circumstances for this to occur.
.
.
Hind Cartwheel.

What genre have you not yet written but really want to try?
Poetry. But not yet.
.
If your books would be made into a movie, who should play the main character?
Johnny Depp.
.
How did you get published? Please share your own personal journey.
Its a work in progress. I had an agent, but I think she was stuck in the headlights of the current revolution in publishing. So far, I’ve done it myself. I’d rather be writing than marketing, so I will likely look for a print publisher after I finish my current infatuation with ‘Stories of the Southern Sea.’ I’ve learned that there is a lot of published nonsense, even more unpublished brilliance, and a vast number of brilliant authors that were either discovered long after they departed this mortal coil, or never were discovered. For me, it’s not about the notoriety, it’s about the notation.
.

Orions Cartwheel

.
What do you find is the best part of being an author?
The perfect peaceful solitude in imprinting your thoughts on an otherwise uncaring universe, one irrevocable word at a time.
.
What’s one thing that your readers would be surprised to know about you?
How amazed I still continue to be at how amazing this journey still is.
.

Thank you so much for taking the time during your busy life and answering our questions!

Here is one more:
Where can people learn more about your writing and you as an author?  

http://www.lawrencewinkler.com

https://www.facebook.com/lawrencewinklerauthor

http://www.amazon.com/Lawrence-Winkler/e/B008UVGLM2/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1

http://bit.ly/Yn6LsB   (short link to Dr. Lawrence Winkler’s books on Kobo)

http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6460890.Lawrence_Winkler

https://twitter.com/LawrenceWinkler

http://pinterest.com/drwink/boards/

.
xTheFinalCartwheel_

.
.
.

<><><><><>
.

If you would like to get help in all things publishing, have your book heavily promoted and learn how to navigate social media sites: We offer all this and more for only a “token” of $1 / day for 3 months. Learn more about this individual book marketing help: http://www.111Publishing.com/seminar

If you enjoyed this blog post, please feel free to check out all previous posts of this blog (there are more than 710 of them : ) if you haven’t already. Why not sign up to receive them regularly by email? Just click on “Follow” in the upper line on each page – and then click on “LIKE” next to it. There is also the “SHARE” button underneath each article where you can submit the article to Pinterest, Google+, Twitter, Chime.in, Facebook, Tumblr and StumpleUpon.

Thanks a lot for following:

@111publishing

http://on.fb.me/TvqDaK
http://bit.ly/VmtVAS 111Publishing @ Google+

.

.
Hyper Smash
.
.

Pingates

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Distribution of Your Print Book

.

New York City - Manhattan

New York City – Manhattan

.

A proud moment for every author: to discover their book in a bookstore or library. However distribution of your book to stores is one of the toughest nuts to crack when it comes to publishing, compared to how easy it is to get your print book into Amazon, Barnes&Noble or Apple. And then there are discounts, returns and commissions… not to speak of waiting times till your invoice is paid. Book distributors & wholesalers take care of all this – for a price.
.

POD print and distribution
For small amounts of print books, say less than 2,000 books, an author is better off to have it “printed on demand”, done by CreateSpace or by Lightning Source, who are also the distributors. The printing might be higher priced, but you can decide on discounts and there will not be any returns from book stores for unsold books, which can be costly. POD produces only after receiving orders.
.

Distributors
Let’s assume your book sells like hot cakes and you would like to have it distributed to book stores. So, how to find a book distributor? And should you go with a big, national or a smaller distributor?
An advantage to small distributors (often specialized in certain genres) is that they often know their bookstores better than larger distributors. The orders tend to be smaller but more realistic. Returns with larger distributors to bookstore chains can be very high: 30% returns is expected, but it can be as high as 70%.

Another option is to make an arrangement with a medium-size publisher who already has a distribution deal and a sales team. For a percentage of the sale, they could include your book in their catalog, which goes out with the sales reps to book stores across the country, and their sales team will present your book. Some publishers may want all the attention for their own titles, but some may like the idea: there’s no printing cost for them, for instance. Their catalogs are produced 5-6 months in advance.

Many large US book distributors won’t take you on before you have at least five to ten books in print. They might also want you to have a sales team who will present your books to booksellers, to show that you are willing to move those books. They also prefer a contract for a certain number of years. Another issue with full service distribution is that they take a minimum of 20% commission, but it will often be closer to 30% if you’re a small publisher. Check them out before signing with any book distributor. Talk to their customers (both publishers and bookstores) to verify they would be a recommendable company for you to work with.
.

Be aware of these book industry distribution arrangements

  1. Discounts: Bookstores get ($8 when a $20 book sells) or in percent, a 40% discount from the distributor, big box stores often get 45%.
  2. Returns: Bookstores can return books back for credit against future orders, on average, about 30% of their initial sales might be returned. Paperbacks are not “stripped” so they can be shipped out again when another bookstore orders them. However, distributors may charge for warehousing of returns.
  3. Commission: Sales reps work on commission and only gets paid when books “sell through” (sold to the consumer). The distribution company also works on commission, which is one of the reasons they are so picky about taking on non-validated clients: if the books don’t sell through, they lose the money they have spent storing and shipping the books, their commission is usually 25-30% ($5-6 on a $20 book).

.
Direct Sales via your website
There is an even more lucrative way to sell your print book and distribute it: through your own website. You keep 100% of your revenue, and you know exactly who bought your books. Valuable data that you can use for promotion of your next book releases. The only “work” you have, is to stuff envelopes and ship your books once or twice a week – or more if you sell a lot. Setting up a PayPal account and an ordering form on your website is pretty easy. Direct selling means that you can make almost three times the amount per book than you can make, compared to a sale through traditional bookstore distributors.
.

Book Fairs
Comb the Internet and regional newspapers for Book Fairs. Rent a booth or share one with other writers and have fun to meet readers in person, sign your books, maybe even meet library buyers and book store owners – and keep 100% revenue. Authors could even band together and exhibit at national and international book fairs, such as New York, Edinburgh, Leipzig, Bologna or Frankfurt. If ten or more authors for example share the cost for exhibition, travel and accommodation, it seems to be visible.
.

Consignment at Bookstores
Some local independent bookstores will take books on consignment. A 60% to you, 40% to them split might seem a bit unfair to the uninitiated, but it’s the standard in the book trade. If sales are really good, some bookstores will offer to buy your book or you offer it to them which saves on paperwork and hassle. In this case you might offer them 50% discount.
.

Fazit:
Small publishers and author-publishers with at least 3 books might be better off with Lightning Source / Ingram and CreateSpace combined – until their book sale numbers are into the several thousands – also due to the print on demand possibilities that both companies offer.

Lightning Source connects you with the world’s largest distribution channel of book wholesalers and retailers. In addition to distributing books through their parent company Ingram Books, they print to order, which means, your book is printed and ready for shipment in 12 hours or less. With over 30,000 wholesalers, retailers and booksellers in over 100 countries your titles will gain the maximum exposure.

Lightning Source / Ingram work  with over 28,000 publishers of all sizes around the world. They deliver digital, print, wholesale and distribution services through a single source, and makes it easy for you to reach more customers in more places.

CreateSpace has slightly lower print on demand fees and set up fees per book, but it doesn’t get you into Ingram worldwide distribution. They offer something, called the Expanded Distribution Channel: “the potential to distribute your book to a larger audience through more outlets including: retailers, bookstores, libraries, academic institutions, wholesalers, and distributors.” Well “potential” which means actually nothing! If a bookstore is really willing to order a single book from them, they will deliver…

Whole Sale and Book Distribution in USA

  • BCH Fulfillment & Distribution – BCH is also a vendor for Ingram, Baker & Taylor, Amazon and Barnes and Noble. BCH offers 24/7 telephone order taking, an on-line catalog, representation at major trade shows, and more.
  • Atlas Books – Distributes online, via wholesalers, and commissioned sales reps. AtlasBooks is the distribution and marketing arm of the BookMasters Group which represents small to mid-size publishers.
  • Midpoint Trade Books – works with small and medium size publishers. No catalogs, so they can take on new titles any time of the year. 
  • National Book Network – Distributes for 85 publishers, they offer Print on Demand, starting at 20 books
    .

Book Whole Sale / Distribution in Canada:

  • North 49 – trade book wholesaler with an inventory of over 3000 bestselling books from more than 500 publishers from Canada, UK and USA 
  • Librarybound – a wholesaler delivers Canadian books to libraries (fulfillment orders only, no warehousing)
    .

More resources:

Distributors and Wholesalers, compiled by IBPA, Independent Book Publishers Association
https://www.ibpa-online.org/resources/distributor-wholesalers/#.UWlwW7VO-So

Create Space Vs Lightning Source
http://write2publish.blogspot.ca/2011/02/why-create-space-is-better-than.html

.

<><><><><>
.

With 30 years experience in both, print and now e-publishing, we can provide you with many more tips, background information and support – additional to the huge amount of promotion you get in our online and off-line seminars. http://www.111Publishing.com/seminars

 

If you would like to get help in all things publishing, have your book heavily promoted and learn how to navigate social media sites: We offer all this and more for only a “token” of $1 / day for 3 months. Learn more about this individual book marketing help: http://www.111Publishing.com/seminar

If you enjoyed this blog post, please feel free to check out all previous posts of this blog (there are more than 710 of them : ) if you haven’t already. Why not sign up to receive them regularly by email? Just click on “Follow” in the upper line on each page – and then on “LIKE” next to it. There is also the “SHARE” button underneath each article where you can submit the article to Pinterest, Google+, Twitter, Chime.in, Facebook, Tumblr and StumpleUpon.

Thanks a lot for following:

@111publishing

http://on.fb.me/TvqDaK
http://bit.ly/VmtVAS 111Publishing @ Google+

.

.
Hyper Smash
.
.

Pingates

 
2 Comments

Posted by on April 13, 2013 in Marketing, Publishing

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

How to organize Printing or Print on Demand


Printing – to sell more books?

Why should you have a print book, such as a paper back and not go with the digital version only? In a former blog post we listed eleven reasons for this:

  • The majority of book buyers still chooses printed books at the moment (that will change)
  • You can give out review copies to newspaper/magazine or book blog reviewers
  • To be hosted at local media / TV interviewers who want to show a copy of your book
  • To sell your book easier to libraries
  • To participate in a Goodreads giveaway
  • To sell your book to those who really don’t want an e-Reader or just love paper books
  • If you write non-fiction it is almost a must to offer it in paper as well
  • You have an ISBN number and can get listed with Bowker at worldwide bookstores
  • Physical books are just nicer to give on Christmas – unless you put an e-book on a new e-Reader and wrap it
  • To sell more e-books! Yes – because they seem to cost so much less in comparison…
  • To list your book in more categories / genres on Amazon: per book type you are allowed to choose two categories / genres. Two print and two digital versions – which increases your books’ visibility and also shows you exactly in which genre you have the most success.
    .
Espresso Book Machine

Espresso Book Machine

.

During your pre-production phase you acquired already a bar code (for your print book) and an ISBN, the International Standard Book Number, a 13-digit number that uniquely identifies books published anywhere in the world. How to get one? Or better a blog of ten, if you intend to write more books. The price of a blog of ten is the same as buying only two ISBN’s.

Good news for authors in Canada: ISBN are free for Canadian citizens, publishing a book in Canada – no matter were it is sold. But that’s not the only benefit for the publishing industry in this country.

Selling your e-book on Amazon doesn’t necessarily require an ISBN, you will get automatically an ASIN, Amazon’s identifier. Other retailers may require an ISBN, such as Kobo for example.
ISBN numbers are assigned by a group of agencies worldwide coordinated by the International ISBN Agency in London, England.  In the United States, ISBN’s are assigned by the U.S. ISBN Agency: R.R. Bowker is the independent agent in the US for this system. You can apply for an ISBN online. On average it takes about two weeks for ISBN’s to be assigned. Getting your own ISBN is very important, as the initial purchaser of this number is considered officially as the publisher. Don’t fall for “free” ISBN and don’t purchase it from other sources than the official organizations.

 

Plan and calculate printing carefully
Unless you have hundreds or even thousands of paperback orders, it doesn’t make sense to have your book printed the traditional way. Book printers expect a run of at least five thousand books to give you a reasonable price per book. Avoid to be one of these authors who have a garage full of books and no idea how to sell them ever. Get your distribution channels (more about this in one of the next blogs) first and then order your printing.
.
For small print runs consider “Print On Demand”
CreateSpace and Lightning Source are recommendable POD’s who offer small print quantities and are distributing your book to wholesale and retailers. They have changed the book publishing landscape considerably. The issue of discounts and returns (the banes in book selling) are one of the primary reasons you might use them. Getting into Lightning Source (LSI) requires you have at least three books for sale. If you have only one book, you can band together with other authors, however, one of you has to be the official publisher. You can get your book into Amazon.com and Barnes&Noble.com with only a 20% discount, and you avoid accepting returns.
.

Use both POD services for best results
Printing through Lightning Source is the least expensive way to get your book into Amazon.com. If you get into Amazon via a distributor or the Amazon Advantage program, you’ll pay a slightly higher discount. Lightning Source is owned by Ingram, so when you sign up with LSI and pay $12 per year (per title), you get your book into Ingram’s large distribution network.
The benefit of CreateSpace: it’s owned by Amazon and your book will always show as available on Amazon’s website. However you can go with both to get full advantages and broader distribution of your book.
.

For just a few copies use “Espresso Book Machine”
If you don’t want to have print books, but would like to have a book signing or your grandma wants a copy of your book in paper, use either a print shop that offers digital printing or any of these Espresso Book Machines that are sprouting up in large cities. You certainly can order it online from them and get it shipped. Their prices are a bit higher, but if you need a bunch of books “yesterday” then it is a good option. Locations can be found at their North America Map.
.

Traditional book printing
Finding a cost effective Book Printer who wants to deal with a small publisher requires a bit of a search. Most printers can print books but few printers are professional book printers. There are only about 50,000 printers in North America and only a handful of them are book printers. Few book printers want to work with the first time publisher. Get referrals from other writers, check out books in your library that often shows the name of the printer or ask at writer seminars others about their experiences with printers. Don’t just order it from the first book printer you cross, get at least ten quotes for printing & binding prices, including shipping costs and references to have enough points to compare. Then ask those printers to give you titles of books they printed, and even maybe contact the independent authors, who dealt with the printer. A Google search or the Better Business Bureau regarding the printers reputation might be helpful too. Sample printing calculations can be found here: http://www.selfpublishing.com/

.
Expect at least about 2-3 weeks in average including freight, but this depends heavily on your printer’s schedule – The earlier you book, the less time you need to budget. Add at least ten days as a safety margin for unforeseen’s, such as lost freight, weather disasters, machine breakdowns and other delays. A great source for detailed information about the printing process and explanations of trade-specific “slang” can be found at http://www.creativemindspress.com/printing.htm

.
Use the printing time to increase your marketing efforts:

  • Plan and advertise the book launch
  • Get as many pre-order for your book as possible
  • Increase Social Media efforts and sign up with even more reader forums
  • Spruce up your web page and write lots of blogs
  • Prepare news / press releases
  • Schedule interviews and book signings
  • Use Google+, Flickr, Pinterest etc. to show your new books’ cover image

.
The book release date is not the end of your book journey, but the beginning. Your book should have an active life span of at least 2-5 years, and much longer for an e-book, as it is a living document and can be revised to a new version any time. You now have almost a full-time job of being an author, and should continue to perform all of the marketing activities that you have been ramping up before.  More about book distribution channels in the next blog post. Stay tuned!

.

<><><><><>

.

If you would like to get help in all things publishing, have your book heavily promoted and learn how to navigate social media sites: We offer all this and more for only a “token” of $1 / day for 3 months. Learn more about this individual book marketing help: http://www.111Publishing.com/seminar

If you enjoyed this blog post, please feel free to check out all previous posts of this blog (there are more than 710 of them : ) if you haven’t already. Why not sign up to receive them regularly by email? Just click on “Follow” in the upper line on each page – and then on “LIKE” next to it. There is also the “SHARE” button underneath each article where you can submit the article to Pinterest, Google+, Twitter, Chime.in, Facebook, Tumblr and StumpleUpon.

Thanks a lot for following:

@111publishing

http://on.fb.me/TvqDaK
http://bit.ly/VmtVAS 111Publishing @ Google+

.

.
Hyper Smash
.
.

Pingates

 
1 Comment

Posted by on April 12, 2013 in Publishing

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Becoming Your Own Publisher: Book Production

.

Project Triangle

Project Triangle

.
Or to be more precise: Pre-Production

I saw a brilliant poster at a print shop / book designer, like the one above, it said:
“Pick Any Two, I Pick One”
It was a triangle and on each tip had these words:  Money – Quality – Time/Speed

Always keep this in mind when you hire freelancer / employees or subcontractors, such as editors, book and cover designers. You get what you pay for… Don’t shop for the cheapest, rather the best partners.
We give you here just an overview whats involved in book production, there are many other tasks that are covered in a great blue print, compiled in Joel Friedlander’s really helpful blog articles
Start with his article: Why Self-Published Books look Self-Published
.

The Editing process:
Even though many authors are talented writers and even spectacular at grammar, they should never be the book editor of their own project. You might have logged long hours going through your manuscript with a fine-tooth comb, read, write, delete, re-write, re-read, delete… Then, after carefully reviewing the spelling and grammar and fact-checking the document, you may have even handed the manuscript over to your your former English teacher and every member of your writing group, however none of this is equal to a professional edit.

Contact editors whose sites inspire confidence and ask about their work process, rates, time frames, and any other information you need to know. Request a sample edit from the respondents you like. Samples are often free, and around five 250-word pages.
The editing process is not meant to offend you or detract from all of the perfecting you have already done. Rather, an edit is meant to increase the quality and success of your book, regardless of subject or genre.
Choose an editor on the basis of compatibility and how well the results of his or her editing appeals to you. ask for references, but learning about the editor’s background shows you how long he or she has been in the business. It also gives an idea of how many and which types of clients have actually trusted him or her to edit.  There are several steps involved in editing and professional trade publishers often employ special editors for each of these steps:

  • Line editing
  • Content Editing
  • Copy Editing
  • Proof Reading
    .

The Book Cover and Title

The correct title can really help ensure the success of your project. Or not… A great cover will raise the attention of potential readers.  And yes, books are judged by their covers.

  • It must be easy to understand and speak. 
  • It should ideally be less than 32 characters.
  • You must be able to purchase the exact URL for the title.
  • Buy your Author name domain also.
  • The title should clearly demonstrate to readers what they will discover in this eBook.

.

Cover Design

  • Keep the design clean.
  • Use a focal point to orient the user
  • Make sure people can read it without glasses. 
  • Make the design match the content.

for print:

  • Use the spine properly.
  • Include a photo of the author.
  • The largest font size is used on the information that is most important

.
Joel Friedlander has a great blog post series about book layout
mistakes to avoidYou can learn almost everything about book design by following Joel Friedlander’s blogs and by reading his books, to be found at www.TheBookDesigner.com.  Technical information can be obtained at Basic Book Design http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Basic_Book_Design for answers to your basic book design questions.

Bookmark these sites:

Editing services:

Lisa Costantino Editing Services
http://www.lisacostantino.com/

Susan Uttendorfsky Adirondack Editing
www.adirondackediting.com

Daniel Kenyon Editing
http://danielkenyon.wordpress.com

.
Cover design inspiration:

http://www.1stwebdesigner.com/inspiration/creative-book-cover-story/
http://faceoutbooks.com/ (print book covers)
http://causticcovercritic.blogspot.ca/
http://www.book-by-its-cover.com/
http://bookdesigner.com/53972/book-covers/
http://bookcovers.creativindie.com/cover-samples/

.
Book cover designers I can personally recommend:

Anitra Jay http://www.anitrajay.com/page:designs
Laura Wright LaRoche http://www.llpix.com
.

e-Book Formatting

Another important step in creating an e-book that should be done by real professionals,
here are two proven e-book designers:
http://e-bookbuilders.com
http://ebookarchitects.com
.

After going through the pre-production stages – the editorial and design part – your next step will be printing and distribution, covered in the tomorrows blog post. However, in the meantime don’t forget to actively market your upcoming book! Get as many pre-orders and reviews as possible, and invite all potential readers to your book launch – virtual and in person.

.

<><><><><>

.
With 30 years experience in both, print and now e-publishing, we can provide you with many more tips, background information and support – additional to the huge amount of promotion you get in our online and off-line seminars.  http://www.111Publishing.com/seminars

If you would like to get help in all things publishing, have your book heavily promoted and learn how to navigate social media sites: We offer all this and more for only a “token” of $1 / day for 3 months. Learn more about this individual book marketing help: http://www.111Publishing.com/seminar

If you enjoyed this blog post, please feel free to check out all previous posts of this blog (there are more than 720 of them : ) if you haven’t already. Why not sign up to receive them regularly by email? Just click on “Follow” in the upper line on each page – and then on “LIKE” next to it. There is also the “SHARE” button underneath each article where you can submit the article to Pinterest, Google+, Twitter, Chime.in, Facebook, Tumblr and StumpleUpon.

Thanks a lot for following:

@111publishing

http://on.fb.me/TvqDaK
http://bit.ly/VmtVAS 111Publishing @ Google+

.

.
Hyper Smash
.
.

Pingates

 
4 Comments

Posted by on April 11, 2013 in e-publishing, Publishing

 

Tags: , , , ,

How to Start Your Own Book Publishing Business

.

244179611017131519_00nq5Z2B_c

.

Where to find all these publishing business information – including lots of links:

95% of all authors have to do the marketing for their books – even if they are the “lucky” ones who found a major, traditional publisher. Only celebrities and star-authors, such as James Patterson or Danielle Steel get publicity from their publishers.  The question for authors is now: Why should they sell their manuscripts for a pittance to publishing houses at all, if these publishers are sending out a mass-press-release only and are otherwise not involved in the marketing part? What are they good for?

.
Authors are smart and able to start their own publishing business, REAL publishing, not POD and not Vanity Publishing: Finding and getting quotes or referrals for an editor, a book lay-out company or book designer, cover artist, e-book formatting company and a printer is not difficult.

.
Setting up their own company
can be done online – in minutes. Find all the necessary information here:
Canada: http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/tx/bsnss/sm/
USA: http://www.sba.gov/content/follow-these-steps-starting-business
UK: https://www.gov.uk/browse/business/setting-up
.

Writing a business plan
https://savvybookwriters.wordpress.com/2013/04/09/how-to-plan-your-publishing-business/
is the work of a couple of days, researching all aspects of the publishing enterprise.
.

Finding distributors / fulfillment company
for your print-version of the book is not a problem, distributors mostly require just three books to be listed as a publishing business, and if authors have not written three books yet, they can band together with other authors to reach this minimum.
.

Books available for future publishers
Aaron Shepard has written two books about the topic of book distribution: POD for Profit and Aiming at Amazon, both contain very detailed information for small publishers.
http://www.amazon.com/Aaron-Shepard/e/B001HD3V8W/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1
Another great source is Dan Poynter’s Self-Publishing Manual, a classic publishing guide book Amazon.com/Poynters-Self-Publishing-Manual-Volume-ebook/dp/B002QB0NTO

.
Learning how to market your book and getting lots of publicity support
https://savvybookwriters.wordpress.com/2013/03/14/10-reasons-to-get-help-boosting-your-books-success/
is offered in a variety of on- and off-line classes by 111Publishing.com/seminars

.
How to create a business plan
for your book publishing company was the topic of our former blog post
https://savvybookwriters.wordpress.com/2013/04/09/how-to-plan-your-publishing-business/
.

Business name
Be careful when choosing a name for your book publishing company. Keep the name neutrally and usable in a variety of languages. Avoid your or your books name and survey several professionals for their input. Last but not least do a name check before your spend money on registering or using the name.
.

Start-up financing and crowd funding
for your book publishing business is preferable through your own savings. Try to find the most economical way to start your publishing business. Don’t order any print runs before you have substantial orders, rather go in the beginning with a recommendable POD, such as CreateSpace. In several countries, such as USA or Germany for example, financing the creation of books has become main stream. Kickstarter, IndiGoGo or STARTNEXT  (German) are crowd funding sources, writers can use.
.

ISBN and bar codes 
In a former blog post we explained how to get an International Standard Book Number (ISBN) and bar codes in several countries.
https://savvybookwriters.wordpress.com/2012/01/30/isbn-numbers-and-how-to-get-one/
.

How to copyright your books and what’s the benefit can be found in this article
https://savvybookwriters.wordpress.com/2012/01/28/why-should-you-register-the-copyright-of-your-manuscript/

.
Most countries require publishers to submit one copy of each book for cataloging in a government archives. In the USA for sample it is done by registering with a Library of Congress number. http://www.loc.gov/publish/

.
How to get into the “Books in Print”, the worldwide database and to register your book for FREE! with Bowker was the topic of other blog posts. https://savvybookwriters.wordpress.com/2011/08/31/important-expose-your-book-to-the-world/.
.

There is no world or national organization that determines a clear-cut genre or category for each book written. https://savvybookwriters.wordpress.com/2013/01/15/how-to-find-your-best-book-category-genre/
However it is extremely important to choose the right genre (or several) in order for your books ranking, e.g. on Amazon.
.

Books you publish, should be available in other countries / languages too!  Not always easy to find a literary agent who is specialized in foreign rights, get lists here:
https://savvybookwriters.wordpress.com/2012/10/10/100s-of-links-to-publishers-and-agents/  or in this article:  https://savvybookwriters.wordpress.com/2011/04/14/foreign-book-rights/
and how to work with literary agents is covered in several previous blog posts. https://savvybookwriters.wordpress.com/2011/04/12/how-agents-work-how-to-work-with-agents/

.
A great article, how to develop a publication timeline can be found in this article. http://www.wizardofebooks.com/2009/09/10/your-self-publishing-timeline/
.

Check out a variety of online retailers to “put your eggs in many baskets”.
https://savvybookwriters.wordpress.com/2012/11/17/put-your-eggs-in-more-than-one-basket/
.

Setting up a website for your book publishing company, establish good practices in Search Engine Optimization (SEO)
https://savvybookwriters.wordpress.com/2011/07/03/boost-your-web-site-search-engine-optimization/

and how to get relevant links are the topic of several former blog posts.
https://savvybookwriters.wordpress.com/2011/10/24/66-tips-to-get-relevant-web-links/
To read them all just click on Website & SEO (28 articles!) on the right hand side of our blog.

.
More resources and advice are the topics of blog articles for the next days, including:

  • Pricing your books and standard book industry discounts
  • Advice and useful links for book layout, printing etc.
  • Financial management / accounting for book publishers
  • Finding freelancers for editing, design, proofreading, webdesign etc.
  • Marketing strategies for book publishing companies
  • professional associations for book publishers
  • educational programs in book publishing
  • Information about book awards and contests
    .

With 30 year experience in both, print and now e-publishing, we can provide you with many more tips, background information and support for setting up your own publishing enterprise – additional to the huge amount of promotion you get in our online and off-line seminars.  http://www.111Publishing.com/seminars

.

<><><><><>

.
Re-blogging this article is encouraged, just use the tiny re-blog button on top of this page!

If you enjoyed this blog post, please feel free to check out all previous posts of this blog (there are more than 720 of them : ) if you haven’t already. Why not sign up to receive them regularly by email? Just click on “Follow” in the upper line on each page – and then on “LIKE” next to it. There is also the “SHARE” button underneath each article where you can submit the article to Pinterest, Google+, Twitter, Chime.in, Facebook, Tumblr and StumpleUpon.
If you would like to get help in all things publishing, have your book heavily promoted and learn how to navigate social media sites: We offer all this and more for only a “token” of $1 / day for 3 months. Learn more about this individual book marketing help: http://www.111Publishing.com/seminar

Thanks a lot for following:

@111publishing

http://on.fb.me/TvqDaK
http://bit.ly/VmtVAS 111Publishing @ Google+

.

.
Hyper Smash
.
.

Pingates

 
 

Tags: , , , , ,

How to Plan your Publishing Business

.

Publishing-Journey

.

Before you explore author-publishing possibilities in this series, lets first have a look at your business plans as an author and the most important question: Why are you writing?  Are you creating for yourself (as a hobby, just for the fun of writing) – or for an audience?
.

Can you answer these questions: how many books with the same topic / the same genre are on the market? What is the sales ranking of these works? How are these books priced? What is the social media ranking of the most successful writers in this genre? Where are these books sold on- and off-line? The advise you read here is based on the assumption that you want to entertain, inform, increase your audience and eventually earn some money with your writing.
.

If you’re producing work for an audience, it means:

  • playing by at least some rules of the industry
  • caring what others think of your work
  • establishing an authors platform from which to communicate
  • interacting with your audience and being available to them
  • doing things not for your art, but out of service to your audience
  • putting on a performance, or adopting some kind of “brand”
  • marketing your work and being visible

.
If you’re creating for yourself, it means:
Writing is worthwhile for you, regardless of who sees your work.

.
Why should authors have a business plan?
Unfortunately many writers first create their work – and ask questions later.  Any author can write a book, but only a successful author knows she/he is now in business.  Again: “Writing is an art – publishing is a business!”  A serious business!
.

There’s no point to go without some kind of strategy in place if your objectives really are in building a writing career. It’s never too early to treat your writing as a business – no one would open a brick&mortar business without a plan!

A business plan can help new (and established) authors to clarify the proper publishing path for their works. A business plan serves as a road map, helping to keep the project and related endeavors like marketing and platform-building on schedule and for the author to track the results of his or her efforts.

The business plan starts when you start thinking about writing a book, it covers all aspects of your future work. At the moment you begin a novel or non-fiction book, you must already have a clear vision of the message, the audience and even the venues where it can be sold.

.
Traditional business plans have these components:

  • Executive summary
  • Business description
  • Market strategies
  • Competitive analysis
  • Design and development plan
  • Operations and management plan
  • Financial factors

.
Sounds a bit theoretical? OK, here is the version for author-publishing:

  • The topic of your work fiction / non-fiction
  • You target audience / readers
  • Your competition online and in book stores
  • The likely contents, length, format etc. of the book
  • Your marketing and promotional strategies
  • The expenses you face for publishing and promotions.

.
It is vital to have a business plan because your books and you are the products to be sold. It makes some writers uneasy, but without a plan, you can’t truly figure out a way for your book to sell itself. Think of it as a map, guiding you from starving writer to successful author.
.

What makes your book so special?
No point in writing a book if you don’t know why or if it’s special. Many writers write books they’d love to read, many write books who’s marketing studies show readers are buying, some write books because the subject is risky or has never been explored before. Know why you and your book is special – and most important: what is the readers benefit of buying your novel or non-fiction book.
.

Who will want to buy your work?
Jot down all those people who likely will want your book, why they’ll want it and how effective they will be at getting more people to want it. Know who your readership target is. Do you have enough (at least 2,000 on each social media outlet) contacts to spread the word about your book? And with contacts I don’t mean other writers, I mean READERS, bookworms, book lovers, book clubs, avid readers, reviewers! That’s the type of audience you will want to look for.
.

Competition
Research in bookstores and online, how many and which books will be comparable to the one you are writing. Check them out in libraries, on reader forums, such as Goodreads, Shelfari or Wattpad. Visit independent stores and go to big chains  research these books on all online stores, not only Amazon, find out what genres are they placed, what reviewers say, how their author pages are designed etc. to get a real picture of your competition – and your potential readers.
.

Format of your book?
Books can be sold in many formats and also in many languages. Research at least these three popular formats:

  • e-book format
  • audio format
  • Print format

.
How do you plan to promote your product?
You know people, hopefully lots of people. Online and off-line. And those people know people. Unless you can spend ten-thousands of dollars every months for advertising, you should plan now, before you write your book social networking, book events, gaining interviews, speaking engagements, seeking book reviews and attending book shows. Schedule all these activities in advance, add as many readers as possible to your current accounts on reader community sites, all social media sites – minimum are: Goodreads, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest and Facebook.
.

What are your marketing strategies?
OK, your book is available on Amazon or in your local book store, but where else might it fit in perfectly? Other online retailers where you can sell your book? Stretch your mind and think creatively: Libraries, book clubs, foreign right sales … there are so many possible outlets for your book. Find out what’s their commissions are, and how much you would make on each sale of your book.

.
Calculations & Pricing
Both, digital and print books need to be proof-read, edited and then formatted, not to forget a really fabulous, enticing cover.
Pricing on print books is largely based on the number of pages in the book and quality of binding, costs for cover design and book layout. Pricing is also dependent on making print books available for a wider distribution than just Amazon. Since a wider distribution is used, books must be priced
so that the other outlets will be offered wholesale pricing.

Turbulence in the rapidly changing eBook world should also be taken into consideration. Pricing may be subject to change based on sales, current pricing trends and need to create upward movement in Amazon rankings. Books may be discounted if it fits with marketing strategy and promotion.
.
Don’t forget other expenses, such as webdesign and hosting, advertising, marketing expenses, phone and internet, travel cost etc.  The good news: you can deduct them from your writers income.
.

What is your timetable for writing, editing, book production, marketing etc.?
After you have figured out your market, your reader audience, your competition and your sales planning, you will feel much better, having a clear vision of your writing / publishing career.  A business plan does not have to be scary, especially for a simple business such as your writing business. In fact, a business plan should be somewhat comforting. It spells out what you want to accomplish, in which time frame and how you plan to do it.

,
Further reading:
http://www.spawn.org/editing/sevenpublishingmistakes.htm
http://selfpubauthors.com/category/business-plan/
http://www.aboutfreelancewriting.com/articles/business/writereality.htm
http://absolutewrite.com/forums/archive/index.php/t-32373.html

.

<><><><><><>

.

If you would like to get help in all things publishing, have your book heavily promoted and learn how to navigate social media sites: We offer all this and more for only a “token” of $1 / day for 3 months. Learn more about this individual book marketing help: http://www.111Publishing.com/seminar

If you enjoyed this blog post, please feel free to check out all previous posts of this blog (there are more than 710 of them : ) if you haven’t already. Why not sign up to receive them regularly by email? Just click on “Follow” in the upper line on each page – and then on “LIKE” next to it. There is also the “SHARE” button underneath each article where you can submit the article to Pinterest, Google+, Twitter, Chime.in, Facebook, Tumblr and StumpleUpon.

Thanks a lot for following:

@111publishing

http://on.fb.me/TvqDaK
http://bit.ly/VmtVAS 111Publishing @ Google+

.

.
Hyper Smash
.
.

Pingates

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

How to Become a Self-Publisher – Step-by-Step Explained

Bookstore1920.

Dear Reader:
This weeks blog posts will be dedicated to one subject only: REAL Self-Publishing.
Keeping all your 
rights, being your own publisher, play by your own rules… During the last weeks you found quite a few articles here on this blog, related to “Author Beware!” What could happen if you contract with so -called “publishers”.
.

Now I will show you HOW you can become a publisher yourself, without contracting, and how you
can publish on your own terms. And it is not theoretical: I began as a publisher of books and an
aviation magazine almost 30 years ago (print) and still do it (print and digital). I also have seen many authors giving the rights to their fabulous work away for a pittance and now are trapped their whole life in very unfavorable contracts.
.
Why should you be your own publisher?
Consulting and coaching authors, I can see every day how difficult it is for authors when they don’t own full rights to their books, even their own book marketing efforts are limited and they have to rely on the mercy of their “publishers” where their books are sold, how long their book is listed, to which price it is listed etc. I know an author who is waiting for more than two years that her books are converted into e-books by her publisher.
.

Being your own publisher

  • it costs less than you think to publish
  • you “shop around”, check quotes and decide your service providers
  • you earn 100% of your net income, don’t have to split it with anyone else
  • your book will be faster on the market, compared to traditional publishing
  • you retain all rights, worldwide and forever for your books
  • you can sell your book as long as you want – not as someone else dictates
  • everything in the publishing process can be easily learned
  • you will have to do your own marketing – no matter if you self-publish or go the traditional route
  • author-publishing is about taking personal responsibility for the management and production of your writing content
    .

Listen to the interview with Hugh Howey,  author of “WOOL” where he explains the benefits of being an author-publisher of his (digital rights) e-books: “No compete clause, having more time to write and you can take your time until your books take off.”
.

James Altucher, another bestseller author wrote in an article about self-publishing:
“I have published eight books in the past seven years, five with traditional publishers (Wiley, Penguin, HarperCollins), one comic book, and the last two I have self-published. In this post I give the specific details of all of my sales numbers and advances with the traditional publishers. Although the jury is still out on my self-published books, “How to be the Luckiest Man Alive” and “I Was Blind But Now I See” I can tell you, these two have already sold more than my five books with traditional publishers, combined.”
.

James Altucher lists the con-site of going the traditional route:

  • Advances are going to zero
  • Marketing by trade publishers is almost zero
  • Grueling long process until the book comes out
  • No control over content and design

… and most amazing: “Often bookstores will look at what’s hot on Amazon and then order the books wholesale from the publishers” – which could be you!
.

Do as most authors did before the 1920’s: they published their own books – before clever business men discovered this as a lucrative way of income. And told writers in the past “no self-respecting writer would self-publish. It’s for losers who couldn’t get their work published by a publishing house.” Why? To get the book rights and make the money – on the expense of authors.
.

It seems self-publishers approach the publishing process more and more confidently, are well-informed, and aware of how much publishing will cost and how long it is likely to take. Finalizing a project you have long planned feels good, and it never was easier to be your own publisher!
This morning the British Guardian had an article, geared to traditional publishers, who are flocking to the London Book Fair,  about the cultural significance what’s going on in the publishing world.

.
Read in the next blog posts:

  • How to plan your publishing “business”
  • Where to find all the necessary information – with lots of links
  • Editing, cover design and book layout
  • Printing and the distribution of your printed book
  • Marketing, communication with readers and book promotions

.

 <><><><><>

.

If you would like to get help in all things publishing, have your book heavily promoted and learn how to navigate social media sites: We offer all this and more for only a “token” of $1 / day for 3 months. Learn more about this individual book marketing help: http://www.111Publishing.com/seminar

.
If you enjoyed this blog post, please feel free to check out all previous posts of this blog (there are more than 710 of them : ) if you haven’t already. Why not sign up to receive them regularly by email? Just click on “Follow” in the upper line on each page – and then on “LIKE” next to it. There is also the “SHARE” button underneath each article where you can submit the article to Pinterest, Google+, Twitter, Chime.in, Facebook, Tumblr and StumpleUpon.

Thanks a lot for following:

@111publishing

http://on.fb.me/TvqDaK
http://bit.ly/VmtVAS 111Publishing @ Google+

.

.
Hyper Smash
.
.

Pingates

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: