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Would You Like to Meet Readers in the Red Room?

23 Jul

RedRoom in WhiteHouse
The Readers and Writers Forum Red Room was named after both a real place and a literary tradition. The Red Room is a small, elegant parlor in the White House, Washington DC, where intellectual, artistic, and political victories have been quietly won.

President Franklin Roosevelt did not initially allow female reporters at his press conferences, so his wife Eleanor Roosevelt held her own press conferences at the same time, for the female reporters, in the Red Room. She was sure to make news, so the male reporters started attending, and the President eventually had no choice but to allow the female reporters at his press conferences in order to get the media’s full attention.

This tradition of civilized revolution on behalf of disenfranchised voices and causes is carried on in the modern-day Red Room.

The Red Room is also the name of four different literary works in different genres, by very different authors, spanning a century. One of these works, written by H.G. Wells, is about confronting fear itself, alone in a small room—a relevant allegory for writers, whether writing a novel or marketing a novel.

We conquer the fear and get all the great readers and writers in the same room, Red Room, for what one reader called, “my dream cocktail party, but you can show up in your pajamas.”  Authors are encouraged to show their books, their book trailers and authors biography and interact with their readers.

 

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